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POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWS

2023-24 CHABRAJA POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWS

The Center, jointly with the Material History Laboratory of the History Department,  conducted a GLOBAL SEARCH (open to candidates worldwide) for  a postdoctoral scholar in African material history.

Chabraja Postdoctoral Scholar in African Material History
Chabraja CCHS Postdoctoral Teaching Fellowships
  1. Claire ARNOLD, teaching a History 292 class on the History of Western Marriage (Spring 2024)
  2. Colin BOS, teaching a History 393 class on Science and Decolonization (Spring 2024)
Chabraja Postdoctoral Fellowships in Public Service
  1. Chernoh BAH—at The Africanist Press
  2. Erica GILBERT-LEVIN (January through August 2024)—at the Institute for Research on Race and Public Policy, UIC)
  3. Gil ENGELSTEIN—at the Gerber/Hart Library and Archives
  4. Charlotte ROSEN— at Public Books 

2022-23
Chabraja CCHS Postdoctoral Teaching Fellowships 

Gil Engelstein is a historian of sexuality and political economy in modern Europe and a 2022-2023 CCHS Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow. He received his PhD in History from Northwestern University in 2022. His first book project, “Queer Europe: Gay Liberation Between Market and Movement,” documents the understudied path of “Rainbow Capitalism” in 1970s Britain and West Germany, and points to LGBTQ commerce as a major force in the articulation of queer culture and politics in postwar Europe. His work has appeared in Contemporary British History, the Journal of Modern Jewish Studies, among others. This spring, he will teach a survey course on "The History of Protest."

Robin Pokorski is a historian of late medieval Europe and a 2022–23 Chabraja CCHS Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow. During her year with CCHS, she will be teaching two courses: a “lecture-ish” course (with plenty of room for student discussion and participation) in Winter on the "High and Late Middle Ages, c. 1000-1500," and a writing seminar in the Spring on "Medieval Women." Her own research examines the intersections of gender, religion, and urban life in fifteenth-century Germany, looking at how Dominican nuns leveraged their communities and networks in support of or opposition to monastic reform. One of her many goals for this year is to think about how to purposefully integrate her research and teaching agendas, and particularly to continue figuring out how to engage students with the distant, foreign past through engaging classroom activities and interesting assignments.

Chabraja History Department Postdoctoral Teaching Fellowship

Marcos Leitão De Almeida received his Ph.D. in African History from Northwestern University in 2020. His book project, “Breaking the Silence: The Deep History of Slavery in Central Africa,” provides a detailed study of the construction and reconfiguration of slavery practices over three thousand years in the Lower Congo, a specific region of Central Africa. It is based on his Ph.D. dissertation, which won the Harold Perkin Prize for the best dissertation in the History department in 2021.

Almeida’s work uses linguistic methods in conjunction with archaeology and documentary sources to trace the distinct historical moments in which Lower Congo peoples innovated concepts of “slaves” and “pawns,” as well as the objects of restraint and techniques of plundering and seizing outsiders. His research has been supported by the Social Science Research Council and the Society of Presidential Fellows at Northwestern University, among others. His work has appeared in the Journal of African History, Azania, and the Oxford Research Encyclopedia of African History.

During his year with CCHS, Almeida will be teaching two courses. In the Fall, Almeida will offer a seminar called "Black Atlantic: Slavery and Diaspora in the Modern World" that discusses the entanglements between racism and slavery in the making of the modern world and how Africans interacted with and reacted against Atlantic slavery. In the Spring, Almeida will teach a course called "The Global History of Slavery," exploring how different historical actors from the earliest times to the 21st century (such as kings, dictators, merchants, and even peasants) have invented so many forms of enslavement throughout history and why such practices still exist today.

 Chabraja History Department Postdoctoral Research Fellowship

Andrea Rosengarten is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the History Department and the Chabraja Center for Historical Studies. She completed her PhD in History at Northwestern in 2022 as a Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellow. Her dissertation focused on the Orange/!Garib River border region of Namibia and South Africa as a rich case study for tracing the entanglement of African and Atlantic world ideas about land access, private land ownership, and wealth in the long 19th century. As a CCHS affiliate she will engage comparatively with work on land management transformation under capitalism across world regions while paying particular attention to dryland areas.In 2020-21 Andrea was the Chabraja Center’s Teaching Initiative Fellow and worked with Prof. Paul Gillingham to develop and teach a new undergraduate global history course called "The End of Citizenship," which explored citizenship as a category of exclusion across place and time.

Chabraja Postdoctoral Fellowships in Public Service

Dr. Guangshuo Yang (he/him) is a postdoctoral fellow at the Chabraja Center for Historical Studies at Northwestern University. In his dissertation, Between the Animal Kingdom and Human States, he probes how ideas about nonhuman animals undergirded identity-making and state evolution by analyzing a Buddhist-led animal protection movement active in early 20th century East Asia. He has also written on post-Mao knowledge production, pest control, slaughter reform, and Chinese sci-fi movies. A previous Newcombe Fellow and Freeman Asian Scholar, Dr. Yang has received grants from the SSRC, the ACLS, the Henry Luce Foundation, and other funding agencies. As the Chabraja Fellow in Public Service, Dr Yang is curating a public history project showcasing how gender and sexual minorities have utilized animal tropes in self-fashioning and community building. 




2021-22 CHABRAJA POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWS
Chabraja CCHS Teaching Postdoctoral Fellowships (History 200 seminars)
 Chabraja History Teaching Postdoctoral Fellowship (History 200 seminar
Chabraja Postdoctoral Fellowships in Public Service
Chabraja Newberry Library Postdoctoral Fellowship